NOTE! This site uses cookies and similar technologies.

If you not change browser settings, you agree to it. Learn more

I understand

Learn more about cookies at : http://www.aboutcookies.org/Default.aspx?page=1

22 mai 2018 | DigiHall Day : les industriels au rendez-vous des innovations numériques

logo digihall day 01 01Rassemblant pour la première fois tous les partenaires de DigiHall1, les DigiHall Days organisés par le List et l’IRT SystemX les 22 et 23 mai 2018 ont attiré plus de 1200 décideurs, industriels et académiques. A la clé : une opportunité unique de découverte des dernières innovations dans le domaine du numérique à Paris-Saclay !

 

Un événement pionnier pour le numérique à Paris-Saclay

L’événement, ouvert le 22 mai 2018 par François Jacq, Administrateur général du CEA, Michel Morvan, Président de l’IRT SystemX, et Philippe Watteau, Directeur du CEA LIST, s’est structuré autour de keynotes et tables rondes sur les 4 thématiques de DigiHall : intelligence artificielle, systèmes cyber physiques, confiance numérique et industrie du futur.

bandeau digihall day 1

 

130 démonstrateurs technologiques, 2000 m2 d’exposition

Le techshow, au cœur des échanges collaboratifs a rassemblé plus de 100 démonstrateurs autour de ces mêmes thématiques, dont 75 issus des recherches du CEA LIST, associant pour la plupart ses partenaires industriels, grands groupes, PME et ses startups.

bandeau digihall day 2

 

Innovation ouverte : une expérience inédite

Les participants ont également eu accès aux plateformes technologiques du CEA LIST (à Digiteo Moulon et Digiteo Saclay) où une trentaine de démonstrateurs illustraient les dernières avancées en robotique, réalité virtuelle et contrôle non destructif.

bandeau digihall day 3

Enfin, pour une expérience plus complète, les participants ont pu découvrir de nouveaux espaces dédiés à l’innovation ouverte, tels que TheDesignSpot, FactoryLab et Additive Factory Hub.

 


1DigiHall concentre des activités majeures de recherche scientifique et technologique dans le domaine du numérique, dans un lieu emblématique qui rassemble le Pôle Systematic Paris-Région, l’IRT SystemX, le CEA List, Télécom ParisTech et Télécom SudParis, ainsi qu’Inria. DigiHall, au cœur de l’Université Paris-Saclay, est soutenu par la Région Ile-de-France.

Les Digihall Days en vidéo

Best of DigiHallDay 2018

Chercheurs en temps réel

Entretiens avec Paris-Saclay le média

Diaporama de l’événement

  • DigiHall Day | Nozha Boujemaa, Directrice de l’Institut interdisciplinaire pour la recherche sur les données DATAIA
    DigiHall Day | Nozha Boujemaa, Directrice de l’Institut interdisciplinaire pour la recherche sur les données DATAIA
  • DigiHall Day | David Sadek, Vice-président Recherche, technologie et innovation, Thales
    DigiHall Day | David Sadek, Vice-président Recherche, technologie et innovation, Thales
  • DigiHall Day | Michel Morvan, Président de l’IRT SystemX, et Philippe Watteau, Directeur du CEA LIST
    DigiHall Day | Michel Morvan, Président de l’IRT SystemX, et Philippe Watteau, Directeur du CEA LIST
  • DigiHall Day | Xavier Lazarus, Cofondateur et Partner, Elaia Partners
    DigiHall Day | Xavier Lazarus, Cofondateur et Partner, Elaia Partners
  • DigiHall Day | François Jacq, Administrateur général du CEA
    DigiHall Day | François Jacq, Administrateur général du CEA
  • DigiHall Day | Estimer les doses d’imagerie en radiothérapie
    DigiHall Day | Estimer les doses d’imagerie en radiothérapie
  • DigiHall Day | Guillaume Boudy, Secrétaire général pour l'investissement
    DigiHall Day | Guillaume Boudy, Secrétaire général pour l'investissement
  • DigiHall Day | La mesure de la performance sportive avec Sport Quantum
    DigiHall Day | La mesure de la performance sportive avec Sport Quantum
  • DigiHall Day | Présentation de Factory Lab
    DigiHall Day | Présentation de Factory Lab
  • DigiHall Day | Visite de la plateforme Contrôle Non Destructif
    DigiHall Day | Visite de la plateforme Contrôle Non Destructif
  • Le DigiHall Day le 22 mai 2018 à Nano-INNOV
    Le DigiHall Day le 22 mai 2018 à Nano-INNOV
  • DigiHall Day | Présentation de MATISS
    DigiHall Day | Présentation de MATISS
  • DigiHall Day | Présentation de la plateforme SKILLS
    DigiHall Day | Présentation de la plateforme SKILLS
  • DigiHall Day | Présentation de l’espace d’innovation ouverte Additive Factory Hub
    DigiHall Day | Présentation de l’espace d’innovation ouverte Additive Factory Hub
  • DigiHall Spring | Cédric Villani teste un cobot d'ISYBOT, start up du List
    DigiHall Spring | Cédric Villani teste un cobot d'ISYBOT, start up du List

 Header Footer plateforme dinscription DigiHallDay Footer

May 17, 2018 | Nanopix, the world’s smallest gamma camera

nanopixThe world's smallest gamma camera was developed to enable Orano to map hot cells at its nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in La Hague, France.

The Nanopix gamma camera is half the size and ten times lighter than its predecessor, the Gampix, making it the most compact gamma camera in its category. The Nanopix was developed by List*, a CEA Tech institute, which had previously developed the Gampix camera. Gamma imaging, which has the capacity to generate images of radioactivity from a distance, is frequently used in nuclear plant decommissioning projects.

Orano needed to be able to map sources of radioactivity in particularly contaminated hot cells—a task that requires a camera that can pass through holes just eight centimeters in diameter. It took three years of research and development to miniaturize the electronics (detection chip) and packaging. The researchers also eliminated some of the Gampix camera's mechanical components. The result—the Nanopix—is just eight centimeters in diameter and five centimeters thick. It is also lightweight at just 268 grams. And, despite its tiny form factor, the Nanopix performs just as well as its bulkier predecessor.

A prototype of the Nanopix was tested and validated on parts of Orano's La Hague site undergoing decontamination. Development work is ongoing, with the goal of integrating embedded intelligence close to the sensor to pre-process data at the detector head. Future plans include automating measurement and giving the camera its own electrical power supply. Ultimately, the camera could be integrated into a terrestrial robot or airborne drone.

*List earned the prestigious Institut Carnot seal in 2006 (Institut Carnot TN@UPSaclay).

http://www.cea-tech.fr/

 

 

 

May 4, 2018 | Blockchain enables real-time audits for food manufacturing

blockchain cea listConnecting Food and List*, a CEA Tech institute, have joined forces to improve quality control in the food manufacturing industry. Their solution, which leverages blockchain technology, can certify the monitoring of products from the production line to the consumer's refrigerator.

Blockchain, originally used to manage cryptocurrency, is an unfalsifiable, collaborative, transparent, secure information storage technology that is not controlled by any given organization. Connecting Food wanted to use blockchain to increase consumers' trust in the food manufacturing industry. The startup partnered with List to develop a real-time product auditing solution to meet the brand's specifications.

List plans to use an incentive model to encourage food manufacturing stakeholders to provide data for the system and, by doing so, overcome one of the technology's disadvantages, which is that it is sensitive to how responsive users are in terms of collaboration.

List also brought extensive knowledge of formal verification methods to pin down the associated business processes and specifications. The institute used artificial intelligence to generate alerts in the event of conflicting events from different sources. The end result is a collaborative auditing system in which each action is certified.

*List earned the prestigious Institut Carnot seal in 2006 (Institut Carnot TN@UPSaclay).

http://www.cea-tech.fr/

 

 

 

April 5, 2018 | Plastic Omnium implements model-driven engineering

Papyrus 250Automotive equipment manufacturer Plastic Omnium is implementing a model-driven engineering (MDE) method leveraging Papyrus, an MDE environment developed by List*, a CEA Tech institute.

Plastic Omnium turned to List to make the processes used to design and develop its fuel tanks and diesel-emissions-reduction systems more efficient. The company is now taking steps to replace its traditional approach—writing specifications in natural language—with a more powerful method. List is helping Plastic Omnium to use model-driven engineering to express its product specifications in a dedicated language.

List researchers are using Papyrus, a design and modelling environment that employs a foundation of common, widely-used design languages. The researchers developed a specific usage of SysML, a general-purpose modelling language, and development processes tailored to Plastic Omnium's needs and working methods.

The result is a software platform Plastic Omnium can use to draw up organized specifications that can be leveraged by information systems. The specifications are more coherent, complete, and detailed and contain fewer redundancies than conventional specifications.

The concept was tested successfully on several pilot projects concerning the design of diesel-emissions-reduction systems. The tests revealed significant improvements in productivity and product quality and indicated possible development cost savings. Based on these results, Plastic Omnium is now implementing the tool at its R&D center with the support of Atos and C-Mind, which provide industrial customers with services related to the Papyrus platform.

*List earned the prestigious Institut Carnot seal in 2006 (Institut Carnot TN@UPSaclay).

http://www.cea-tech.fr/

 

 

 

March 29, 2018 | Remote computing just got more secure

calcul distant 250List*, a CEA Tech Institute, implemented homomorphic encryption technologies that enable "blind"—in other words, totally confidential—computation on data stored on remote servers. Several industrial applications have been developed using the technique.

Homomorphic encryption allows computation on data without knowing the values of that data. Here's how it works: The data is computed exclusively in encrypted form; the result is also encrypted and requires an encryption key to decipher. In research conducted under the EU HC@Works project, List applied its cryptocomputing technology (or compiler) to actual use cases provided by industrial partners, including Atos, which hopes to use the technology in its future e-healthcare platform, which will offer day-to-day in-home patient monitoring services.

One of the major hurdles to the widespread adoption of the technology is that encrypted data requires much more space and much more time to compute—1,000 times more—than unencrypted data. List researchers overcame this challenge by interfacing two different encryption systems. In layman's terms, a traditional encryption system ensures simplified encryption of the data. The encrypted data does not take up any more space than unencrypted data and can thus be sent to Atos' cloud infrastructure. The data is then "trans-encrypted" by a homomorphic encryption system before being processed. Test results are sent from the cloud server to the patient's doctor, who is the only person to possess the encryption key to unscramble the data. The source data can only be read by its owner.

The project has produced some encouraging results, with latency of less than two minutes. The platform is currently being tested in real-world conditions. An open-source version* of the compiler was made available in early 2018 to support the creation of a European community uniting professionals from industry and academia.

1https://github.com/CEA-LIST/Cingulata


*List earned the prestigious Institut Carnot seal in 2006 (Institut Carnot TN@UPSaclay).

http://www.cea-tech.fr/